Fashion at the museum: must see exhibitions in the United States

/ 8:57 p. m.
By Jen and Meli.


One of the things we knew we were going to enjoy the most while living abroad was the chance to get involved in the different activities and events of the fashion industry (because we all know these are not really common in Colombia). Us nerds enjoy museums a lot, and it's great to have the opportunity to look at fashion in museums like real pieces of art and from perspectives that make you think beyond the actual object.

In New York we find key places such as the MET (with an emblematic exhibition opening in the spring, which was closed when we started at Parsons) and the Fashion Institute of Technology (FIT) have incredible fashion exhibitions almost all year round and with different and interesting themes. However, the one we enjoyed the most this season did it not only because of its size but because of its relevance. The Museum of Modern Art or MoMA opened its first fashion exhibit in over 40 years in the sixth floor of the gallery (it is so big it takes the entire floor). We're talking about 'Items: Is Fashion Modern?', a show aiming to frame pop culture within the different objects that have shaped history.
Las categorías en las que está dividida 'Items'
There are 111 categories of objects in total (we told you it's BIG), making this exhibition one of the biggest and most ambitious projects made not only at MoMA, but in the city. Walking through it takes time, so if you're in a rush don't even try it, you're going to waste your money.

The Invisible Dress from Calvin Klein. Don't you feel like
you saw it recently on the red carpet?
‘Items’ is split into very particular categories. It's starts from the inside, literally, with underwear and a section dedicated to special silhouettes, even the pregnant body (with special mannequins set next to the Wonder Bra from Victoria's Secret). It shows us a beautiful selection of black dresses (from Chanel to vintage Dior), and it also makes an interesting tour through objects such as the Ray-Ban Aviators, the wrap dress (strangely placed next to an Indian sari) and other elements like the leather jacket, the bikini and more.

Hello, beauties.


One of the most interesting things about Items is the question it includes in the tittle itself: Is Fashion Modern?, asking us about those objects that we think are modern and really cool and turns out they've been around for a will. Did you know those Adidas Superstar you've been wearing for a while (side note: stop it) were a hit in the 80's? Did you know the bomber jackets have also been around for years? That's how we did the entire exhibition, trying to find things that were really modern, and surprise, surprise... we couldn't find any! (Not that it's bad, it just makes the point). 


But what you can see at MoMA are different curiosities that actually make the point of the exhibition even stonger. Some of them, like the A-POC Queen (a textile made with a mix of cotton and nylon created by Issey Miyakee) were really impressive and some others, like a bottle of sun screen were pretty... weird. However, it's very important to adress the huge effort taken by the museum in the collection of the objects, most of them loans from brands and designers, and others commisioned to young designers. That last one was the part where we shout out of joy when we found the harem pants commisiones to young Colombian designer Miguel Mesa Posada.

These are the pants designed by Miguel Mesa.
Is it worth going? Of course. The exhibit is open through January 28th and every Friday, until 8 p.m, there's free entrance.  Spare a couple of hours and get ready to go out with some questions and wander, because it's not easy to go through.

Also in the U.S, Dominican-born designer Oscar de la Renta is being honored within the walls of a museum, open until the same date as 'Items' (January 28th). Almost 70 designs from the late designer are displayed in three halls of the Houston Museum of Fine Arts, on a walk-through his brilliant career. 



The Glamour and Romance of Oscar de la Renta, curated by Andre Leon Talley, includes different gowns from the archives of the brand and also his personal collection, as well as the archive of Pierre Balmain (brand that he led from 1993 to 2002), private owners and the collection of the Museum of Fine Arts, in Houston.


The gowns are put together to tell a magnificent story of the inspiration, muses and de la Renta's creative process throughout the years, organized in four different categories. The first one, opening the exhibition, shows the strong influence that Spain had on the designer, in this country was wheere he started his career. 

Visitors are welcomed by different outfits showing everything from the most literal interpretation until the most subtle hints of flamenco dancers and 'matador' outfits (also, we could spot a beautiful red gown worn by Beyonce in a Vogue editorial in 2013) that gives an very strong impression of the essence of the brand.


The second part dazzled us woth embroideries, brocades and details reflecting inspirations from Russia, China, Japan and other Asian countries that were present in some of his designs. We could even see Russian-inspired bridal gowns and some others with orient inspiration and cuts. 


The tour goes un with another go-to theme for De la Renta: nature. This we can see in gowns with beautiful flower prints and dream wedding gowns, among them the one made for Amal Clooney, the last one designed by Mr Oscar himself (and of course, this is the closest we've ever been from George).

Amal Clooney's wedding dress.

The final part is the 'night room', with dresses worn by some of the most important first ladies, fashion icons and celebrities of our days: from Taylor Swift to Penelope Cruz, Kirsten Dunst and Karlie Kloss during big red carpets and galas, showing the power and importance of the brand among Hollywood's jet set (although we did miss the one worn by Sarah Jessica Parker at the 2014's MET Gala).

¿Remember Taylor Swift during 2014's MET Gala?
Though this exhibition can be perceived a little small if we put it against some others (like Items or anything at the MET), it does a great job showing the less known details of the life and creation of Oscar de la Renta, specially how big of an influence his wife Annete was, thanks to some of the dresses worn by her, included in the show.

In any way,  The Glamour and Romance of Oscar de la Renta brings the designer to the ground and makes it look more human, while at the same time showing his enormous talent and reminding us of the big hole he left in the industry.

If you have the chance to visit any of this shows, just do it! And of course, show us your pictures. Also, if yoy think there's an exhibit you would like us to review in New York or Paris, let us know!


By Jen and Meli.


One of the things we knew we were going to enjoy the most while living abroad was the chance to get involved in the different activities and events of the fashion industry (because we all know these are not really common in Colombia). Us nerds enjoy museums a lot, and it's great to have the opportunity to look at fashion in museums like real pieces of art and from perspectives that make you think beyond the actual object.

In New York we find key places such as the MET (with an emblematic exhibition opening in the spring, which was closed when we started at Parsons) and the Fashion Institute of Technology (FIT) have incredible fashion exhibitions almost all year round and with different and interesting themes. However, the one we enjoyed the most this season did it not only because of its size but because of its relevance. The Museum of Modern Art or MoMA opened its first fashion exhibit in over 40 years in the sixth floor of the gallery (it is so big it takes the entire floor). We're talking about 'Items: Is Fashion Modern?', a show aiming to frame pop culture within the different objects that have shaped history.
Las categorías en las que está dividida 'Items'
There are 111 categories of objects in total (we told you it's BIG), making this exhibition one of the biggest and most ambitious projects made not only at MoMA, but in the city. Walking through it takes time, so if you're in a rush don't even try it, you're going to waste your money.

The Invisible Dress from Calvin Klein. Don't you feel like
you saw it recently on the red carpet?
‘Items’ is split into very particular categories. It's starts from the inside, literally, with underwear and a section dedicated to special silhouettes, even the pregnant body (with special mannequins set next to the Wonder Bra from Victoria's Secret). It shows us a beautiful selection of black dresses (from Chanel to vintage Dior), and it also makes an interesting tour through objects such as the Ray-Ban Aviators, the wrap dress (strangely placed next to an Indian sari) and other elements like the leather jacket, the bikini and more.

Hello, beauties.


One of the most interesting things about Items is the question it includes in the tittle itself: Is Fashion Modern?, asking us about those objects that we think are modern and really cool and turns out they've been around for a will. Did you know those Adidas Superstar you've been wearing for a while (side note: stop it) were a hit in the 80's? Did you know the bomber jackets have also been around for years? That's how we did the entire exhibition, trying to find things that were really modern, and surprise, surprise... we couldn't find any! (Not that it's bad, it just makes the point). 


But what you can see at MoMA are different curiosities that actually make the point of the exhibition even stonger. Some of them, like the A-POC Queen (a textile made with a mix of cotton and nylon created by Issey Miyakee) were really impressive and some others, like a bottle of sun screen were pretty... weird. However, it's very important to adress the huge effort taken by the museum in the collection of the objects, most of them loans from brands and designers, and others commisioned to young designers. That last one was the part where we shout out of joy when we found the harem pants commisiones to young Colombian designer Miguel Mesa Posada.

These are the pants designed by Miguel Mesa.
Is it worth going? Of course. The exhibit is open through January 28th and every Friday, until 8 p.m, there's free entrance.  Spare a couple of hours and get ready to go out with some questions and wander, because it's not easy to go through.

Also in the U.S, Dominican-born designer Oscar de la Renta is being honored within the walls of a museum, open until the same date as 'Items' (January 28th). Almost 70 designs from the late designer are displayed in three halls of the Houston Museum of Fine Arts, on a walk-through his brilliant career. 



The Glamour and Romance of Oscar de la Renta, curated by Andre Leon Talley, includes different gowns from the archives of the brand and also his personal collection, as well as the archive of Pierre Balmain (brand that he led from 1993 to 2002), private owners and the collection of the Museum of Fine Arts, in Houston.


The gowns are put together to tell a magnificent story of the inspiration, muses and de la Renta's creative process throughout the years, organized in four different categories. The first one, opening the exhibition, shows the strong influence that Spain had on the designer, in this country was wheere he started his career. 

Visitors are welcomed by different outfits showing everything from the most literal interpretation until the most subtle hints of flamenco dancers and 'matador' outfits (also, we could spot a beautiful red gown worn by Beyonce in a Vogue editorial in 2013) that gives an very strong impression of the essence of the brand.


The second part dazzled us woth embroideries, brocades and details reflecting inspirations from Russia, China, Japan and other Asian countries that were present in some of his designs. We could even see Russian-inspired bridal gowns and some others with orient inspiration and cuts. 


The tour goes un with another go-to theme for De la Renta: nature. This we can see in gowns with beautiful flower prints and dream wedding gowns, among them the one made for Amal Clooney, the last one designed by Mr Oscar himself (and of course, this is the closest we've ever been from George).

Amal Clooney's wedding dress.

The final part is the 'night room', with dresses worn by some of the most important first ladies, fashion icons and celebrities of our days: from Taylor Swift to Penelope Cruz, Kirsten Dunst and Karlie Kloss during big red carpets and galas, showing the power and importance of the brand among Hollywood's jet set (although we did miss the one worn by Sarah Jessica Parker at the 2014's MET Gala).

¿Remember Taylor Swift during 2014's MET Gala?
Though this exhibition can be perceived a little small if we put it against some others (like Items or anything at the MET), it does a great job showing the less known details of the life and creation of Oscar de la Renta, specially how big of an influence his wife Annete was, thanks to some of the dresses worn by her, included in the show.

In any way,  The Glamour and Romance of Oscar de la Renta brings the designer to the ground and makes it look more human, while at the same time showing his enormous talent and reminding us of the big hole he left in the industry.

If you have the chance to visit any of this shows, just do it! And of course, show us your pictures. Also, if yoy think there's an exhibit you would like us to review in New York or Paris, let us know!


Continue Reading
Por Jen y Meli.


Una de las cosas que sabíamos que íbamos a disfrutar en el proceso de vivir en otro país era conocer las diferentes actividades y eventos de la industria de la moda (porque ustedes saben que en Colombia no abundan). Nosotras, como las buenas ñoñas que somos, disfrutamos mucho de los museos y es maravilloso tener la oportunidad de ver la moda en un museo como toda una obra de arte y desde enfoques que dejan mucho que pensar. 

En Nueva York, lugares el MET (cuya exposición ya estaba cerrada cuando llegamos a Parsons) y el Fashion Institute of Technology tienen ofertas de moda casi todo el tiempo, y crean diferentes exposiciones a lo largo del año con temáticas bastante interesantes. Sin embargo, la que más nos llamó la atención esta temporada lo hizo no solo por el tamaño sino por su importancia. El Museum of Modern Art, o MoMA abrió por primera vez en más de 40 años el sexto piso de su galería para una exhibición de moda. Se trata de ‘Items: Is Fashion Modern?’, una exposición que buscaba enmarcar la historia de la cultura popular con los diferentes objetos que la han marcado. 

Las categorías en las que está dividida 'Items'
En total fueron 111 categorías de objetos, que están enumerados a la entrada de la exhibición, los que componen la muestra, una de las más grandes y ambiciosas que se han realizado no solo en el MoMA, sino en la ciudad. El recorrido toma bastante tiempo, así que si tienen afán es mejor que ni lo intenten porque no vale la pena pagar la entrada. 

El vestido 'invisible' de Calvin Klein (derecha). ¿No sienten que lo han visto en la alfombra roja recientemente?
‘Items’ está dividido en unas categorías bastante particulares. Empieza desde adentro, literal, con la ropa interior y una sección dedicada a cubrir la silueta, incluso la de las embarazadas (con maniquís especiales que están al lado del famoso ‘Wonder Bra’ de Victoria’s Secret). Nos muestra una selección de hermosos vestidos negros (desde Chanel hasta Dior, de verdad, verdad) y también hace un recorrido bastante interesante por categorías como las gafas de aviador, los tacones, el ‘wrap dress’ (que está extrañamente puesto junto a un sari de la India) y otros elementos interesantes como la chaqueta de cuero, el bikini y más. 

Hola, hermosos.


Una de las cosas más llamativas es de hecho, la pregunta que hace desde el título de la exhibición: ¿es la moda moderna? preguntándonos por esos objetos que creemos son realmente modernos y cool y resulta que también lo eran hace muchos años. Por ejemplo, ¿sabían ustedes que los Adidas Superstar que tanto aman y que todo el mundo se pone (y en serio, ya basta) fueron un hit primero en los 80? ¿Qué las ‘bomber jacket’ también vienen de mucho tiempo atrás? Así fue todo el recorrido de la exposición, tratando de encontrar cosas que realmente fueran nuevas, y resultó que no pudimos ver ni una. 


Lo que sí se puede ver en el MoMA son cosas curiosas que apoyan la exposición. Algunas, como el A-POC Queen, un textil de algodón y nylon creado por Issey Miyake fueron realmente impresionantes y otras, como una botella de bloqueador solar fueron bastante… raras. Pero el mayor esfuerzo que hizo el museo fue en recolectar las piezas, la mayoría de préstamos de marcas y diseñadores pero otras comisionadas a jóvenes talentos, que fue la parte en la que gritamos de alegría al encontrar la versión de un pantalón harem hecha por el colombiano Miguel Mesa Posada. 


El pantalón que creó Miguel Mesa para la muestra
¿Vale la pena ir a verlo? Por supuesto. Está hasta el 28 de enero y los viernes la entrada es gratis hasta las 8 p.m. Dispongan de tiempo y prepárense para hacer preguntas porque no es una exhibición fácil de digerir.

En otro rincón de Estados Unidos, el diseñador dominicano Oscar de la Renta también ocupa los espacios de un museo. Hasta la misma fecha (28 de enero), casi 70 creaciones del fallecido creador adornan tres grandes salas del Museo de Bellas Artes de Houston en un recorrido por su ilustre carrera.
The Glamour and Romance of Oscar de la Renta, curada por André Leon Talley, está compuesta por trajes que hacen parte de los archivos tanto corporativos como personales del diseñador, además del archivo de Pierre Balmain (casa de modas que lideró de 1993 to 2002), coleccionistas privados y la colección del Museum of Fine Arts, Houston.
Las piezas se unen para contar la historia de sus fuentes de inspiración, sus musas y su proceso creativo, y se organizan en cuatro secciones temáticas. La primera, que abre la exhibición, refleja la fuerte influencia que tuvo España en De la Renta, pues fue donde comenzó su carrera.
El público es recibido por trajes que muestran desde las interpretaciones más literales hasta los atisbos más sutiles de bailarinas flamencas y trajes de matador (además de la presencia de un bellísimo traje rojo que Beyoncé usó en una editorial de Vogue en 2013) que de entrada entrega una imagen fuerte de la creación de De la Renta.

La segunda parte muestra con bordados, brocados y apliques el imaginario sobre Rusia, China, Japón y otros destinos de Asia que caracterizaron muchos de sus diseños. Se aprecian desde trajes de novia de tradición rusa hasta aires de medio oriente en estampados y cortes.
Continúa con una sección de otro de sus grandes temas recurrentes: el jardín y la naturaleza, que se ve reflejado en vestidos de románticos estampados florales y trajes de novia de ensueño, entre los que destaca el hecho para Amal Clooney (es lo más cerca que hemos estado de George).
El vestido de novia de Amal Clooney.
La muestra culmina con una sala nocturna que exhibe trajes llevados por algunas de las más reconocidas dignatarias, íconos de la moda y celebridades de la actualidad: desde Taylor Swift y Penélope Cruz hasta Kirsten Dunst y Karlie Kloss en noches de gala, entregas de premios y demás alfombras rojas, mostrando el poder de la marca y firma de De la Renta entre la crema y nata de Hollywood (aunque nos hizo falta el que Sarah Jessica Parker lució en la gala del MET del 2014).
¿Recuerdan a Taylor Swift con el vestido rosado en la gala del MET del 2014?
La exhibición, a pesar de que se aprecia un poco pequeña en comparación con otras de mayor magnitud y escala, permite acercarse a detalles menos conocidos de la vida y creación de Oscar de la Renta, especialmente por la fuerte presencia de su esposa Annette en la muestra gracias a los varios vestidos utilizados por ella que la componen.

De alguna manera, The Glamour and Romance of Oscar de la Renta aterriza al couturier y lo hace más humano, a la vez que exalta su enorme talento y nos recuerda la huella que dejó en la industria.

Si tienen la oportunidad de visitar alguna de estas muestras, no duden en hacerlo, y por supuesto, ¡muéstrennos sus fotos!




By Meli.

Usually, we like the first red carpet of the year because we haven’t seen one un months, but this year’s Golden Globes were special for another reason. Almost every celebrity in attendance wore black outfits in support of the Time’s Up and #MeToo initiatives.


Por Meli.

Usualmente la primera alfombra roja del año nos gusta porque llevamos un buen rato sin verlas, pero la gala de los Golden Globes este año fue especial por otro motivo. Casi todas las celebridades asistentes lucieron atuendos en color negro para solidarizarse con diversas causas: desde el acoso sexual en Hollywood hasta la discriminación laboral hacia las mujeres.


Por Jen y Meli.


De nuevo estamos aquí pidiendo disculpas por la ausencia, pero venimos prometiendo que el 2018 será un año más constante para Moda 2.0. En unas semanas empiezan las alfombras rojas y mientras tanto, los vamos a entretener contándoles cositas varias.

By Meli.

After 45 minutes looking for a decent and fast streaming online, Jen and I could enjoy a new edition of Miss Universe.

Por Meli.

Después de 45 minutos buscando una transmisión en vivo rápida y de buena calidad, Jen y yo pudimos disfrutar desde la comodidad de nuestras pantallas de computador una nueva edición de Miss Universo.

By Melissa.

The red carpet drought we've been going through these past few months has been hard, but the Emmys arrived to entertain us. We can always count on them to recharge us with a balanced share of dresses. This year we saw an equal ammount of beautiful, glamorous looks and outfits that should have never left the atelier.


Por Meli.

La sequía de alfombras rojas nos tenía un poco tristes, pero llegaron los Emmy para entretenernos. Siempre podemos contar con ellos para cargarnos con una equilibrada cuota de vestidos.


Este año no fue la excepción y así como vimos bellos y glamorosos atuendos, también hubo —como siempre— looks que nunca debieron salir de casa.

Mejores

Nicole Kidman en Calvin Klein

Jen no se enamoró tanto como yo de este vestido, pero yo quedé eternamente prendida de su belleza. Una silueta clásica con detalles interesantes y un color arrollador. El detalle juguetón de los zapatos —bellamente a la vista de todos— le dio un toque memorable.


Vale destacar que el largo al tobillo no es fácil de llevar: por pocos centímetros un traje puede pasar de apropiado a inapropiado para una gala (más sobre esto cuando veamos a Michelle Pfeiffer).

Viola Davis en Zac Posen

Siguiendo con el tema de colores ganadores, nada hace ver más esplendorosa la piel de Viola Davis que este naranja de ensueño. Una silueta y estructuras favorecedoras resaltan si figura y mejores atributos. ¡Nos encanta!

Shailene Woodley en Ralph Lauren

Más colores contrastantes para hacerme feliz. Este bellísimo verde oscuro hizo voltear las miradas hacia la joven actriz (además del escote de vértigo, muy bien logrado). Nos hubiera gustado un peinado más pulido y un poquitín más de color en los labios faltó para que fuera un look perfecto.

Michelle Pfeiffer en Oscar de la Renta

Le faltaron solo un par de centímetros para que el vestido llegara al punto correcto, porque así se ve muy casual para una noche de gala. SIN EMBARGO, es tan bello que había que ponerlo en esta lista.

Felicity Huffmnan en Tony Ward

Creo que perdí la cuenta de las veces que he dicho que quiero envejecer con la misma gracia que esta mujer. No solo tiene un cuerpo de infarto, sino que lo sabe vestir a la perfección. Es un placer verla en cada alfombra roja a la que asiste.

Millie Bobby Brown en Calvin Klein

Así como en su momento nos pasó con Kiernan Shipka, nos encanta ver a esta pequeña en la alfombra roja. Quien quiera que se encargue de su estilo hace un excelente trabajo al ponerle looks elegantes pero apropiados para su edad. Nos emociona saber cómo evolucionará su estilo a medida que crezca.

Peores


Reese Witherspoon en Stella McCartney

Un lindo color, una buena silueta, una estructura fuerte y favorecedora. Todo está muy bien, excepto porque ES UNA MINIFALDA EN UNA NOCHE DE GALA. Es tan terrible ese sencillo hecho que ni siquiera me puedo concentrar en su peinado de estúpida.

Ariel Winter en Zuhair Murad

Esta es probablemente la última vez que la ponemos en esta lista. No porque tengamos esperanza de que mejore (ya ese barco zarpó) sino porque es una reincidente como Heidi Klum que comete siempre los mismos errores. Demasiado ajustado y demasiado desnudo, la elegancia salió corriendo apenas se puso ese vestido.

Tessa Thompson en Rosie Assoulin

Bienvenidos a un nuevo capítulo de ‘Frankendress’. Plisado, acabado metálico, multicolor, color block y cut-outs: lo único que le falta a este vestido es una antena parabólica.

Ajiona Alexus

Bienvenidos a un nuevo capítulo de ‘Frankendress’, edición nupcial, en donde Ajiona Alexus es novia y novio a la vez, del mismo modo, en el sentido contrario.

Tracee Ellis Ross en Chanel

Jeniffer manda a decir: “puede ser Chanel, pero está todo MAL”.

Claire Foy en Oscar de la Renta

El principal motivo de su aparición en esta lista no es el diseño del vestido como tal, sino el ajuste del mismo. Es un enterizo bello, pero no le hace ningún favor a su cuerpo. Las proporciones están completamente mal y resulta viéndole bajita, de torso corto, piernas anormalmente largas y cabezona.

Menciones especiales


Debra Messing en Romona Keveza

Tan cerca y tan lejos. Nos da una enorme tristeza que un vestido con un diseño tan clásicamente hermoso, haya sido echado a perder con la tela más repelente del planeta. Nada más de verla, toda brillante y escandalosa, me da ganas de mirar para otro lado.

Lea Michele en Elie Saab

El único motivo por el que alguien con un caso tan severo de ‘peinado de estúpida’ está en esta lista es porque el vestido es realmente hermoso y el color es bello.

Jessica Biel en Ralph and Russo

Aunque un poco... adulto para alguien tan joven, el vestido es bello. Pero nos sobra la cola y el peinado ochentero.

Mandy Moore en Carolina Herrara

No está en las mejores porque no es muy memorable, pero nos alegra ver un vestido que, a pesar de ser blanco y negro, propone algo interesante en su silueta.

Angela Sarafyan en Elizabeth Kennedy

Excelente elección de color y buen uso del volumen, aunque el detalle de las mangas no esté tan bien ejecutado como podría.

Evan Rachel Wood en Moschino

Absolutamente maravillosa. Esta chica sabe muy bien cómo llevar un traje a una alfombra roja (ya lo ha demostrado). Aunque hay pequeños detalles que nos molestan (a mí, la extrema anchura de la bota y a Jen, el “exceso” de botones), el look como un todo es ganador.

Zoe Kravitz en Dior Haute Couture

Con este los papeles son opuestos que en el caso de Nicole Kidman: Jen lo ama pero yo no, y creo que no es tanto por el vestido en sí mismo sino porque creo que no es para ella. Siento que son incompatibles.

¿Qué les pareció nuestra elección? ¿Nos faltó alguien? Cuéntennos en los comentarios y no dejen de seguirnos en redes sociales para recibir contenido exclusivo de Moda 2.0